Spaghetti Science

Ever run out of soup noodles and relied on breaking up spaghetti into small 1 to 2 cm pieces? That's what I just did, and I never realized how many 1-2 mm fragments are generated with each and every break. In fact some bits were even smaller than a millimeter. I realized it by fluke... Continue Reading →

Lessons Learned From The Sandoz Disaster

Love Science (and Math too!)

Circled in red is the site of the 1986 Sandoz disaster. Circled in red is the site of the 1986 Sandoz disaster.

In 1986, on the border of Switzerland and Germany, 1350 tonnes of highly toxic compounds suddenly went up in flames at a warehouse belonging to Sandoz (now part of Novartis). The fire brigade responded promptly and put out the fire in about five hours. But to do so they used millions of liters of water. Due to inadequate catch basins at the factory, 20 tonnes of a pesticide-brew tagged along and flowed into the Rhine. Eventually within a couple of weeks, along a 400 km path, fish and birds were killed, and so were most of the eels in the river. The Ijssel River as far as the Netherlands was affected, even though they closed floodgates. Initially a Sandoz spokesperson had dismissed the 70-km long red slick as “a harmless dyestuff” Understandably the safety director of the company was later pelted with dead eels by protestors.

The most problematic…

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